Pelosi Calls Trump’s Wall ‘Immoral,’ 7th Generation Texas Rancher Educates Her

As the partial government shutdown over border security looms on, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) is calling the idea of a border wall “immoral.” However, she’s been schooled by a seventh generation Texas rancher, who went on live television to offer Pelosi a much-needed education on the matter.

Ruperto Escobar (Photo Credit: Screen Capture/Fox News Insider/YouTube)

Although she enjoys the security of a wall around her own sprawling home in California, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) had the audacity to call a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border “immoral, ineffective, and expensive,” during a press conference.

“Most of us, speaking for myself, consider the wall immoral, ineffective and expensive,” Pelosi said. “And the president said he promised it. He also promised Mexico would pay for it. So even if they did, it’s immoral still, and then they’re not going to pay for it.”

But, according to The Daily Caller, seventh generation rancher Ruperto Escobar of Texas explained why America needs a wall along our porous southern border with Mexico. He even said that he would give up part of his own 600 acres of land, which has been in his family for more than 250 years, to help start construction.

“The problem there right now is primarily drug trafficking,” Escobar said Wednesday during an appearance on Fox & Friends. “I’ve lived there 75 years and let me tell you, I’ve seen everything happen there.”

“Right now I must access the river because I have a pumping site,” explained the rancher. “And I have good, workable road to the river. And you ought to see the amount of traffic that happens primarily going back towards the river. People that get caught with their vehicles full of drugs and then they speed back toward the river at very high velocity, past my house. A whole slew of police after them.”

When Fox & Friends co-host Steve Doocy asked Escobar what he would say to Pelosi about her claim that the wall is “immoral,” Escobar replied, “I’d say, ‘Ma’am, I don’t know where you get your facts but from what we have endured, my lifetime, which is about 75 years now, of seeing the number of illegals coming across here, trampling over our fences, the drug dealers tearing down our gates, that is immoral. And we’re tired of it. We need that wall.'”

Ruperto Escobar is not the only one to debunk Nancy Pelosi’s claim that a border wall is immoral. President Donald Trump noted the glaring hypocrisy of Pelosi’s absurd claim, saying, “Look, when they say the wall is ‘immoral,’ then you better do something about the Vatican. The Vatican has the biggest wall of them all.”

“The wall is immoral?” he added. “Look at all of the countries that have walls. They work 100 percent. Never going to change. A wall is a wall.”

Even members of Pelosi’s own political party are starting to wake up. House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer admitted that a physical barrier along the U.S.-Mexico border is a necessary component to solving our immigration issues. Hoyer told Fox News’ Neil Cavuto that “physical barriers are a part of the solution.”

This, of course, is in direct contrast to Pelosi’s narrative that barriers are somehow “immoral.” According to Hoyer, walls are not immoral if they are used to protect people, which would be the function of the wall President Trump has proposed along the southern border.

Nancy Pelosi knows that walls are not immoral. After all, she has one around her own home. This is simply a political talking point she uses to tug at the heartstrings of bleeding-heart liberals.

It certainly could be argued, however, that Pelosi’s refusal to negotiate with President Trump in order to find a compromise which would reopen the government, is immoral. There are hundreds of thousands of government workers currently going without a paycheck so that Pelosi can play her petty political games. It’s hard to think of anything more “immoral” than that.

About That Conservative Girl, Opinion Columnist 1959 Articles
That Conservative Girl is a millennial living in Southern California on a small farm in Cherry Valley. Passionate about faith, family values, and individual liberty, when she isn't bringing you the news she's listening to Merle Haggard and dreaming of Montana.